G-Stomper Studio
G-Stomper Rhythm
G-Stomper VA-Beast

User Manual                                                            

 

App Version:          5.4.3
Date:                   
28/04/2017
Author:                  planet-h.com

Official Website:     http://www.planet-h.com/

 

Contents

17              Audio Export & Bouncing. 2

17.1         Audio Export 2

17.1.1       Export Pattern Set (Song Arrangement) as Audio. 3

17.1.2       Export Pattern as Audio. 7

17.1.3       Export multiple Patterns as Audio. 12

17.2         Audio Session Recorder / Real-Time Audio Export 17

17.2.1       Start a new Recording Session. 17

17.2.2       Stop the running Recording Session. 20

17.3         Bouncing. 21

17.3.1       Bounce Sample from a Sampler Track. 21

17.3.2       Bounce single Sampler Track. 24

17.3.3       Bounce single VA-Beast Track. 27

17.3.4       Bounce multiple Tracks. 31

17.4         Export/Bounce in Studio Quality. 36

17.4.1       Sample Rate Conversion Warning. 36

17.4.2       Change the G-Stomper Sample Rate. 37

 

17           Audio Export & Bouncing

This Chapter explains what the Audio Export & Bouncing features are about and how you use them.

Audio Export in general means to create audio (.wav) from loops or complete songs you’ve created in G-Stomper.

G-Stomper Studio provides two main ways to export audio files:

All G-Stomper full versions export in a quality up to 32bit 96kHz Stereo.

 

17.1        Audio Export

Audio Export describes the process of exporting one or multiple Tracks as one or multiple audio (.wav) files. For external use, e.g. in your Ableton or other studio setup, separate tracks are most suitable. If you want to share a Song with the rest of the world, then a sum export (a final mixdown) is probably what you need.

G-Stomper Studio can export either single Patterns or a complete Songs. Both can be exported as sum/mixdown (one file) or track separated (multiple files, one for each track). G-Stomper gives you the full freedom to choose what and how you want to export.

 

 


17.1.1           Export Pattern Set (Song Arrangement) as Audio

Show up the Main Menu (on every screen).

To export a Song Arrangement, select the EXP tab, and then choose
“Pattern Set (Song Arrangement) as Audio”.

Select the way you want to export, Sum/Mixdown or separate Tracks.
In most cases, Song Arrangements are exported as Sum/Mixdown (which is the default).


“Show Tracks” shows up detailed controls to select/deselect particular Tracks.

 

Select the Tracks you want to export, or deselect the Tracks to be excluded from the process. When exporting Song Arrangements, in most cases, all available Tracks should be selected (which is the default).

 

Note:
The number of available Tracks depends on the Sampler- and Synthesizer settings in the setup dialog (Sampler / Number of  Sampler Tracks, Synthesizer / Number of Synthesizer Tracks).


Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
Here are some examples:
Final export for audio CDs: 16bit, 44100Hz, Stereo
Raw export to be mastered using external studio equipment: 24bit, 96000Hz, Stereo

 

Select a Post Processing method.

In most cases „Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)” is the best choice (which is the default for regular exports).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a name for the exported file.
(By default, the exported file is named like the exporting Pattern Set)

 

Finally, confirm with OK to start the export process.

 


17.1.2           Export Pattern as Audio

Show up the Main Menu (on every screen).

To export a single Pattern, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Pattern as Audio”.

Select the way you want to export, Sum/Mixdown or separate Tracks.


“Show Tracks” shows up detailed controls to select/deselect particular Tracks.

 

Select the Tracks you want to export, or deselect the Tracks to be excluded from the process. By default, all audible Tracks are selected.

To avoid unnessecary load on the cpu and also to avoid empty (silent) export files, silent Tracks (Tracks without audible output, e.g. muted Tracks or Tracks without a sequence) are automatically excluded.

Tracks which are used as side chain signal for effects (see Chapter: Effects > FX side Chaining) are mandatory selected to ensure that side chained effects always sound as expected, even if only a single Track is exported.

 

Note:
The number of available Tracks depends on the Sampler- and Synthesizer settings in the setup dialog (Sampler / Number of  Sampler Tracks, Synthesizer / Number of Synthesizer Tracks).


Select the number of loop cycles (1..32) to be exported.
Multiple loop cycles means to export a Pattern multiple times in a row.
By default, 1 loop cycle is exported.

 

To ensure smooth running audio loops, audio parts that overlap the end of a Pattern (e.g. a long sample or a reverb or delay effect tail) can be wrapped around and mixed in at the start of the exported audio loop.

If you do not want the overlapping audio getting looped/wrapped for some reason, disable this checkbox.


Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
Here are some examples:
Final export for audio CDs: 16bit, 44100Hz, Stereo
Raw export to be mastered using external studio equipment: 24bit, 96000Hz, Stereo

 

Select a Post Processing method.

In most cases „Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)” is the best choice (which is the default for regular exports).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a name for the exported file.
(By default, the exported file is named like the exporting Pattern, with a Tempo/BPM suffix applied)

 

Finally, confirm with OK to start the export process.

 


17.1.3           Export multiple Patterns as Audio

This feature is exclusive in G-Stomper Studio and lets you export multiple Patterns from the Pattern Set as separate audio files in a single operation.

Show up the Main Menu (on every screen).

To export a multiple Patterns, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Multiple Patterns as Audio”.

The showing dialog is just for your information. Simply press OK or, if you don’t want to show it up the next time, activate the “Got it!...” checkbox in advance.


Select the way you want to export, Sum/Mixdown or separate Tracks.

 

Select the Patterns you want to include.

For this example, we leave the selection at „All Patterns in the Pattern set” (which is the default).

You can also choose ..
All Patterns in the Pattern Set
A selection of Patterns in the Pattern Set
All Patterns in a selection of Pattern Banks (A, B, C, D) in the Pattern Set

Note:
Silent and empty Patterns are ignored and automatically excluded from the selection.


Select the number of loop cycles (1..32) to be exported per Pattern.
Multiple loop cycles means to export a Pattern multiple times in a row.
By default, 1 loop cycle is exported.

 

To ensure smooth running audio loops, audio parts that overlap the end of a Pattern (e.g. a long sample or a reverb or delay effect tail) can be wrapped around and mixed in at the start of the exported audio loop.

If you do not want the overlapping audio getting looped/wrapped for some reason, disable this checkbox.


Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
Here are some examples:
Final export for audio CDs: 16bit, 44100Hz, Stereo
Raw export to be mastered using external studio equipment: 24bit, 96000Hz, Stereo

 

Select a Post Processing method.

In most cases „Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)” is the best choice (which is the default for regular exports).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a base name for the exported files.
(By default, the export files are named like the surrounding Pattern Set, with a Pattern Slot and Tempo/BPM suffix applied)

 

Finally, confirm with OK to start the export process.

 


17.2        Audio Session Recorder / Real-Time Audio Export

The Audio Session Recorder lets you record the Master Out Signal as .wav in real-time.

While the regular Audio Export is dedicated to export already created Patterns or Songs, the Audio Session Recorder is used to capture the audio output while you’re doing live jams.

The Audio Session Recorder captures the signal right before it leaves the G-Stomper Audio Engine, which means you have zero quality loss due to D/A - A/D conversion.

What quality you actually get only depends on your format selection and the setting of the audio engine.
(see Chapter: Export/Bounce in Studio Quality)

17.2.1           Start a new Recording Session

Long press Record to show up the extended Record menu.

In the menu, press ‘Start Audio Session Recorder’.


Select the Recording Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
Here are some examples:
Final export for audio CDs: 16bit, 44100Hz, Stereo
Raw export to be mastered using external studio equipment: 24bit, 96000Hz, Stereo

 

Select a Post Processing method.

In most cases „Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)” is the best choice (which is the default for Audio Session Recordings).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a name for the recorded file.
(By default, the recorded file is named like the currently loaded Pattern Set)

Once you’ve entered the file name, the recording session starts.

Please take note that the Audio Session Recorder remains in paused state, if no sound is playing in the moment you start a recording session. In this case the Timer flashes and remains at zero.

The recording will start as soon as the first sound starts playing.

Once started, the recording will run unil you stop it manually (see next Chapter) or until an auto-stop is triggered (if the app goes to background, the storage is full or if silence of more than 15 seconds occurs).


17.2.2           Stop the running Recording Session

Long press Record to show up the extended Stop menu.

In the menu, press ‘Stop Audio Session Recorder’.

The recorded .wav file will be located in the folder ‘gstomper/export‘ on your device storage.


17.3        Bouncing

Bouncing in G-Stomper describes the process of exporting a particular Sample or Track and replacing the outgoing Sample or Track with the exported audio. Usually bouncing is applied, when you run out of effect slots or if the audio processing gets too CPU-consuming. In such a case you can bounce a sample or a track to a single audio file with all real-time processing rendered into.

A bounced Sample or Track sounds exactly the same as it sounded before it was bounced, but with the benefit that all the used audio processing is no longer applied in real-time.

G-Stomper Studio can bounce single Samples or complete Tracks.

17.3.1           Bounce Sample from a Sampler Track

Bouncing a Sample means to create a new Sample from a Track Sound with all Track related audio processing (Sample/Track Settings, Filter, Mod Env and Mixer Channel settings including Channel Insert Effects and Channel EQ) rendered into, and to load the bounced sample to the original Track afterwards.

Please note that bouncing a Sample does not include the Sequence. Also note that the main Effect chain is not included when bouncing single Samples. To include the Sequence and the Effect chain to the bounced result, bounce the complete Track instead (see Chapter(s): Bounce complete Sampler/VA-Beast Track).

Long press a T[..] pad to show up the Track menu (Track Pad Mode must be Play/Menu).

To bounce the Track Sample, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Export/Bounce Sample”.


By default, the bounced Sample gets automatically loaded to the Track, once the bouncing process is done.
If you don’t want to auto-load the bounced Sample, disable this checkbox.

 

Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
In most cases, the best choice for bounced Samples is to keep the defaults.




Select a Post Processing method.

For bouncing, in most cases „No Post Processing” is the best choice (which is the default for all bouncing operations).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a name for the bounced sample.
(By default, the bounced file is named as the original Sample)

Finally, confirm with OK to start the bounce process.


Important Note:
Be aware of overwriting already bounced Samples. Overwriting a bounced sample will replace the Sample on all Patterns/Tracks where it was used already. If you’re not sure about that, choose a new (non-existing) file name instead.


17.3.2           Bounce single Sampler Track

Bouncing a Sampler Track means to create an audio loop from a single Track with all audio processing rendered into (with exception of the Master/SumFX section), and to replace the original Track with that bounced loop.

Bouncing a complete Track does include the Sequence as well as the Effect chain.
Since the bounced Track (once it’s rendered) still passes through the regular Master/SumFX section, the bounced loop does not include the Master/SumFX section.

Long press a T[..] pad to show up the Track menu (Track Pad Mode must be Play/Menu).

To bounce the complete Track, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Export/Bounce complete Track”.

Important Note:
Bouncing a Track replaces the complete Track Sequence with a static audio loop, which means that the Track has a fixed tempo once it is bounced. A bounced Track cannot be un-bounced, so choose wisely or at least backup the Pattern in advance.


To ensure smooth running audio loops, audio parts that overlap the end of a Pattern (e.g. a long sample or a reverb or delay effect tail) can be wrapped around and mixed in at the start of the exported audio loop.

If you do not want the overlapping audio getting looped/wrapped for some reason, disable this checkbox.

 

Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
In most cases, the best choice for bounced Tracks is to keep the defaults.




Select a Post Processing method.

For bouncing, in most cases „No Post Processing” is the best choice (which is the default for all bouncing operations).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)


Choose a name for the bounced loop.
The Track number will be automatically applied as a suffix.
(By default, the bounced loop is named like the containing Pattern, with a Tempo/BPM suffix applied)

Finally, confirm with OK to start the bounce process.


Important Note:
Be aware of overwriting already bounced loops. Overwriting a bounced loop will replace the loop on all Patterns/Tracks where it was used already. If you’re not sure about that, choose a new (non-existing) file name instead.


17.3.3           Bounce single VA-Beast Track

Bouncing a VA-Beast Track means to create an audio loop from a single Track with all audio processing rendered into (with exception of the Master/SumFX section), and to load that bounced loop to a Sampler Track of your choice.

Bouncing a complete Track does include the Sequence as well as the Effect chain.
Since the bounced Track (once it’s rendered) still passes through the regular Master/SumFX section, the bounced loop does not include the Master/SumFX section.

Note: Bouncing a VA-Beast Track requires a Sampler Track to bounce into.

Long press a VT[..] pad to show up the Track menu (Track Pad Mode must be Sel/Menu).

To bounce the complete Track, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Export/Bounce complete Track”.

Important Note:
Bouncing a Track replaces the complete Track Sequence with a static audio loop, which means that the Track has a fixed tempo once it is bounced. A bounced Track cannot be un-bounced, so choose wisely or at least backup the Pattern in advance.


To ensure smooth running audio loops, audio parts that overlap the end of a Pattern (e.g. a long sound or a reverb or delay effect tail) can be wrapped around and mixed in at the start of the exported audio loop.

If you do not want the overlapping audio getting looped/wrapped for some reason, disable this checkbox.

 

Select the Sampler Track to bounce the VA-Beast Track into.


Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
In most cases, the best choice for bounced Tracks is to keep the defaults.

 

Select a Post Processing method.

For bouncing, in most cases „No Post Processing” is the best choice (which is the default for all bouncing operations).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)

 


Choose a name for the bounced loop. The Track number will be automatically applied as a suffix.
(By default, the bounced loop is named like the
containing Pattern, with a Tempo/BPM suffix applied)

Finally, confirm with OK to start the bounce process.


Important Note:
Be aware of overwriting already bounced loops. Overwriting a bounced loop will replace the loop on all Patterns/Tracks where it was used already. If you’re not sure about that, choose a new (non-existing) file name instead.

 

 

Once the bouncing process is done, the bounced loop will automatically be loaded to the selected Sampler Track, while the original VA-Beast Track got muted.


17.3.4           Bounce multiple Tracks

Bouncing a multiple Tracks means to create an audio loop (mixdown) from a selection of Sampler and/or VA-Beast Tracks with all audio processing rendered into (with exception of the Master/SumFX section), and to load that bounced loop to a Sampler Track of your choice.

Bouncing multiple Tracks does include the Sequence as well as the Effect chain.
Since the bounced Track (once it’s rendered) still passes through the regular Master/SumFX section, the bounced loop does not include the Master/SumFX section.

Note: Bouncing multiple Tracks requires a Sampler Track to bounce into.

Show up the Main Menu (on every screen).

To bounce muliple tracks, select the EXP tab, and then choose “Export/Bounce multiple Tracks”.


The showing dialog is just for your information. Simply press OK or, if you don’t want to show it up the next time, activate the “Got it!...” checkbox in advance.

 

Select the Tracks you want to export, or deselect the Tracks to be excluded from the process. By default, no Tracks are selected.

To avoid unnessecary load on the cpu and also to avoid empty (silent) export files, silent Tracks (Tracks without audible output, e.g. muted Tracks or Tracks without a sequence) are automatically excluded and not available for selection.

Tracks which are used as side chain signal for effects (see Chapter: Effects > FX side Chaining) are mandatory selected to ensure that side chained effects always sound as expected, even if only a single Track is exported.

 

Note:
The number of available Tracks depends on the Sampler- and Synthesizer settings in the setup dialog (SETUP / SMP / Number of  Sampler Tracks, SETUP / SYN / Number of Synthesizer Tracks).


To ensure smooth running audio loops, audio parts that overlap the end of a Pattern (e.g. a long sample or a reverb or delay effect tail) can be wrapped around and mixed in at the start of the exported audio loop.

If you do not want the overlapping audio getting looped/wrapped for some reason, disable this checkbox.

 

Select the Sampler Track to bounce the Tracks into.

 


Select the Export Format.

Bit Rates: 8bit, 16bit, 24bit, 32bit(float)
Sample Rates: 22050Hz, 32000Hz, 44100Hz, 48000Hz, 64000Hz, 88200Hz, 96000Hz

Note:
What sample format you choose strongly depends on your personal needs.
In most cases, the best choice for bounced Tracks is to keep the defaults.

 

Select a Post Processing method.

For bouncing, in most cases „No Post Processing” is the best choice (which is the default for all bouncing operations).

Note:
Further Post Processing options:
- Normalize Level to -0dB (channels linked)
- Normalize Level to -0dB (each channel independently)
- No Post Processing (leave the mix as is)

 


Choose a name for the bounced loop. The Track number(s) will be automatically applied as a suffix.
(By default, the bounced loop is named like the
containing Pattern, with a Tempo/BPM suffix applied)

Finally, confirm with OK to start the bounce process.

 

Important Note:
Be aware of overwriting already bounced loops. Overwriting a bounced loop will replace the loop on all Patterns/Tracks where it was used already. If you’re not sure about that, choose a new (non-existing) file name instead.

 

 

Once the bouncing process is done, the bounced loop will automatically be loaded to the selected Sampler Track, while all the original Tracks are muted.

Note: The original Track T02 in this example was replaced with the bounced loop.

 


17.4        Export/Bounce in Studio Quality

All G-Stomper full versions support audio export formats up to 32bit 96kHz Stereo.

For best results, when exporting audio with Sample Rates of 44100Hz or higher, it is important to run G‑Stomper in the same Sample Rate as you want to export.

Then, and only then, the complete audio pipeline is processed in the higher Sample Rate.

If you export with a higher Sample Rate than the current audio engine Sample Rate, then a Conversion is required, which results in quality loss. In such a case the audio engine shows up a Sample Rate Conversion warning (see next Chapter: Sample Rate Conversion Warning).

17.4.1           Sample Rate Conversion Warning

If you run G-Stomper on 44100Hz for example, and export at 96000Hz, then a Sample Rate conversion will be applied, which is always a quality loss.

If this is the case, you’ll get a Sample Rate conversion warning.

You’re of course free to export anyway.

But you’ll get much better results, if you change the Sample Rate of the G-Stomper audio engine to 96000Hz in advance. Once you’re finished with the exporting, you can switch the Sample Rate back to your regular setting (see next Chapter: Change the G-Stomper Sample Rate).


17.4.2           Change the G-Stomper Sample Rate

Show up the Setup dialog (main screen)

Change the Sample Rate to your desired value.

Close the Setup dialog and restart G-Stomper.